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Permaculture III

Course CodeVSS106
Fee CodeS1
Duration (approx)100 hours
QualificationStatement of Attainment

LEARN TO MANAGE ANIMALS IN A PERMACULTURE LANDSCAPE

  • Understand the relationship between animals and permaculture systems
  • integrate domesticated and wild animals, in a permaculture system.

Lesson Structure

There are 8 lessons in this course:

  1. Integrating Animals into a Permaculture System/Garden
  2. Role of Insects and Other Small Animals
  3. Poultry
  4. Bees
  5. Grazing Animals: Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Rabbits
  6. Managing Larger Animals and Wildlife
  7. Aquaculture Production Systems
  8. Aquaculture Species to Grow

Each lesson culminates in an assignment which is submitted to the school, marked by the school's tutors and returned to you with any relevant suggestions, comments, and if necessary, extra reading.

Aims

  • Understand the principles behind integration of animals in permaculture systems.
  • Understand the role of insects and other small animals in permaculture systems.
  • Understand the role of poultry and bees in the permaculture system.
  • Develop knowledge of the role of grazing animals in permaculture systems.
  • Understand the role of aquaculture production systems in permaculture.
  • Develop knowledge of the range of aquaculture species available for permaculture systems.

What You Will Do

  • Outline how to plan and prepare garden zones in relation to animals. Provide step-by-step instructions and accompanying photographs or drawings.
  • Visit some outside environment close to your home such as a garden, a park, a piece of bushland or a water course. Find and list as many things as you can. Try to see what relationships they might have with other biotic and abiotic components of the environment.
  • Draw a 'Web' to illustrate the interrelationships you find in the ecosystems you observe.
  • Explain "companion planting" in relation to the insect-plant relationship.
  • Contact your state department of Agriculture and obtain leaflets relating to poultry which you are particularly interested in keeping.
  • Contact your state department of Agriculture and obtain leaflets (and any other publications) relating to bee keeping.
  • Explain the importance of bees to horticulture and the permaculture garden.
  • Enquire to the local agricultural agency on how to make dams and how to water proof them.
  • Write a report explaining the advantages and disadvantages of aquaculture and mariculture.
  • Develop a 5 year plan for developing a one hectare permaculture farm utilising plants, animals and fish (aquaculture). Use drawings and diagrams where needed to assist in this report.
  • Attempt to draw a life cycle diagram of a fish or freshwater crayfish. Include all stages and if possible give a size indication or age indication for each stage.
  • Select three different aquatic animals which would be appropriate to grow in a permaculture system. For each one in turn, explain how you would incorporate it into a permaculture system.

Why Birds are Important

Birds in the landscape can be a real joy to watch, but they also contribute in many very practical ways to the overall environment.

  • They eat insects and other pests, helping to control problems that might occur for both plants and other animals.
  • Their droppings help replenish nutrients in the soil.
  • They clean up unwanted weed seeds
  • They help the germination of some plant seeds through the actions of chemicals on the seed as it passes through their digestive system.

The things we put into a garden and where they are put will affect the number, type and location of birds we find entering the garden.

Useful Birds

Obviously fowl such as chickens and ducks can be kept for their eggs, meat, and contribution to pest control and soil fertility.

Wild birds can also be valuable though, and are an integral part of any ecosystem, whether natural or contrived.

Predatory birds keep vermin populations under control, among other things. Others help control pest populations and pollinate plants.
Indigenous birds are more likely to be living in balance with the local environment, feeding on seeds, insects and other small animals. They are may include song birds, birds of prey (predators), scavengers insect eaters, nectar eaters, etc. All play an important part in the environment and their presence should generally be viewed as mostly positive. In general, they complement the natural environment. They are rarely destructive of the garden. They often have beneficial effects such as keeping a control on insect populations.

Pest Birds

There are some bird species that have spread widely around the world; and are often (though not always) an undesirable component of an ecosystem. These include such things as starlings and sparrows all being hardy species that can often compete strongly with indigenous birds, causing a decline in indigenous populations and a reduction in biodiversity.

Many of these are aggressive, have bred in large numbers and can have a negative effect on the environment. These “bad” birds have been responsible for spreading weeds and in some cases turning native species into weeds by carrying their seeds into areas where they were originally not from.  

How Plants May Benefit Birds

  • By providing protection from predators such as cats. Example: Dense scrub such as a clump of paperbark or tea tree will provide cover for birds.  
  • Trees provide places where birds can perch out of reach of predators. Rotten cavities in trees can provide nesting places and should not be removed if possible.
  • By providing an environment where food sources can grow. Example: Insects, slugs, and other animals grow on plants. Some types of insects thrive in flowers. Dead foliage dropped from plants provides mulch on the ground where earthworms and other small animals grow.
  • By providing nesting materials. Example: Twigs, leaves etc. collected by birds are used for nests.
  • By providing protection from extremes of the weather (e.g. on hot days).
  • By providing seeds, fruits, pollen and nectar for birds for birds to eat.



WOULD YOU LIKE TO ACHIEVE THE PERMACULTURE DESIGN CERTIFICATE?

IF SO, THERE ARE THREE PATHWAYS TO ACHIEVE THE PDC WITH ACS DISTANCE EDUCATION BY COMPLETING EITHER –

PATHWAY 1

PERMACULTURE I

PERMACULTURE II

PERMACULTURE III

PERMACULTURE IV

PATHWAY 2

PERMACULTURE SYSTEMS COURSE

PATHWAY 3

CERTIFICATE IN HORTICULTURE (PERMACULTURE)

ACS Distance Education is a member of the Permaculture Association (UK) and The Alternative Technology Association (Australia)

 

Why Study the Course?

This is a great course to choose, if you want to not only learn about the subject now;
but keep learning after you finish studying. We believe a good course should not only
develop intelligence and knowledge; but also:

  • Improve your ability to communicate with others within the discipline
  • Develop problem solving skills relevant to this discipline 
  • Expand awareness and develop creativity
  • Facilitate networking (develop contacts within an industry)
  • Develop attributes that set you apart from others in your industry
  • Motivate you, build confidence, and more

According to some authorities, success is actually only affected about 20% by your knowledge and intelligence.

Our school works at helping you in a holistic way, to develop all of the things
mentioned above, in a way that relates to the discipline you are studying; and
in this way, giving you the capacity to apply yourself to unanticipated problems,
to understand new information as it emerges, to see and seize on new opportunities
as they reveal themselves, and to continue to grow your abilities within your discipline
as you progress through life after study.

In a world that is changing faster all the time; it is difficult to even be certain how this industry
might change between the start of your course, and the time you finish studying.
With this in mind; any course that is to have long term value in today's world, must develop
broad generic skills (as above). This approach to education is not unique to ACS, but it is
an approach tested, proven and adopted in our courses; and an approach that is also used
by some of the most successful, cutting edge universities and colleges around the world.

 

Learning Facilities

ACS follows the old fashioned idea that “the student comes first”. Our staff are told to treat every student as an individual and respond promptly to their enquiries; and the facilities we have developed and continue to develop, are all focused on that goal. Facilities include:

  • Offices in two time zones (UK and Australia) –which means an international team of academics are responding to students 5 days a week and 16 hours a day.
  • An online student room with unique resources that are only available to students studying our courses, including online library.
  • Bookshop offering quality downloadable e books
  • A data base of 20 million words of unique information written by our staff over 3 decades that can be drawn upon if needed by academics for use in supporting our students.
  • Systems that ensure assignments are tracked, marked and returned to students, fast -commonly within a round 1 week & rarely more than 2 weeks (note: many other colleges take longer).
  • The school is active in social networking and encourages students to connect with us and each other.
  • No automated handling of student phone enquiries. When you call you get a real person; or leave a message and a real person will call you back within a day, but more commonly within an hour or two.
  • No additional charges for extra tutor support over the phone or email.
  • Free careers advice for graduates –It is our policy to provide support and advice to our students even after they graduate. If a graduate needs help with getting a CV together, or advice on setting up a business or looking for work; they only need ask.
  • The quality of academic staff is higher than many other colleges.


Meet some of our academics

Bob JamesHorticulturalist, Agriculturalist, Environmental consultant, Businessman and Professional Writer. Over 40 years in industry, Bob has held a wide variety of senior positions in both government and private enterprise. Bob has a Dip. Animal Husb, B.App.Sc., Grad.Dip.Mgt, PDC
Christine ToddUniversity lecturer, businesswoman, photographer, consultant and sustainability expert; with over 40 years industry experience B.A., M.Plan.Prac., M.A.(Social). An expert in planning, with years of practical experience in permaculture.
Diana Cole B.A. (Hons), Dip. Horticulture, BTEC Dip. Garden Design, Diploma Chartered Institute of Personnel & Development, PTLLS (Preparing to Teach in the Life Long Learning Sector), P.D.C. In addition to the qualifications listed above, Diana holds City & Guild construction qualifications and an NPTC pesticide spraying licence (PA1/PA6). Diana runs her own landscape gardening business (Arbella Gardens). Active in many organisations including the British Trust for Conservation Volunteers.
John Mason Parks Manager, Nurseryman, Landscape Designer, Garden Writer and Consultant. Over 40 years experience; working in Victoria, Queensland and the UK. He is one of the most widely published garden writers in the world; author of more than 70 books and editor for 4 different gardening magazines. John has been recognised by his peers being made a fellow of the Institute of Horticulture in the UK, as well as by the Australian Institute of Horticulture.


Check out our eBooks

Animal PsychologyComparative Animal Psychology. This is an excellent reference for anyone interested in understanding animals better; students, animal owners and anyone who works with animals.
PoultryPoultry are entertaining as pets and life sustaining as a commercial product! Whether you are seeking a book as a beginner poultry keeper or if you are embarking on a new career in poultry production or management, this book is for you. Easy to read, easy to understand and packed with easy to implement practical advice. Know how to care for the health and wellbeing of poultry and make production a commercially viable enterprise.
Growing & Knowing GrassesGet to all about the botany of grasses, how to identify them, how to cultivate grasses, the different uses for grasses and also includes a detailed illustrated encyclopedia of grasses and grass-like plants.
Bees, Beekeeping and HoneyA very comprehensive eBook about all about bees, bee health, keeping bees, and producing honey.